Fox host compares Kavanaugh's SCOTUS hearing to Christ's crucifixion
Fox host compares Kavanaugh's SCOTUS hearing to Christ's crucifixion

Fox host compares Kavanaugh's SCOTUS hearing to Christ's crucifixion

Daily Mail
October 6, 2018


Fox News host Greg Gutfield has compared the treatment of SCOTUS nominee Brett Kavanaugh to the crucifixion of Jesus Christ, giving a bizarre history of the event in his explanation.

Kavanaugh, who has been accused by multiple women of sexual assault and aggressive behavior, faced tough grilling from Democrats during his confirmation hearings and an additional FBI investigation ahead of the vote to confirm him as a member of the Supreme Court bench.

To Gutfield, who told viewers he attended 12 years of Catholic school and believes the Son of God was killed to stop 'mob rule', said the additional pressure was similar to the brutal death of Jesus.

'Crucifixion was an important event because it was designed to establish a wall between justice and mob rule - Christ died so that the mob wouldn't survive,' Gutfeld said.

'What Democrats have tried to do is tear down the wall between justice and mob rule.

'They decided to crucify someone once again.'

Kavanaugh's confirmation process has been extremely political, with the judge himself claiming opposition to his nomination from Democrats was not based on concern there were allegations of sexual assault against him, but in fact simply a means of taking 'revenge on behalf of the Clintons'.

'This whole two-week effort has been a calculated and orchestrated political hit fueled with apparent pent-up anger about President Trump and the 2016 election, fear that has been unfairly stoked about my judicial record, revenge on behalf of the Clintons and millions of dollars in money from outside left-wing opposition groups,' he ranted during the hearing.

His testimony during his hearing on the sexual assault allegations ranged from furious to tearful, and left many questioning if he could handle the lifetime job in the nation's highest court.

On Thursday, he tried to curry favor with the public with an op-ed in the Wall Street Journal.

In his piece, he admitted he had been 'too emotional at times' while he read his testimony to the judiciary committee.

I know that my tone was sharp, and I said a few things I should not have said,' he wrote.

'I hope everyone can understand that I was there as a son, husband and dad.'

On Friday, after viewing a contentious report by the FBI into the allegations, the Senate announced there would be a 51-49 vote for his nomination to the Supreme Court.

The vote will be finalized on Saturday afternoon.


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Kali Yantra